Embodying Process Workshop

with Amber Imrie

This course is for artists who need to workshop projects in a supportive (yet critically engaged) environment. This non-hierarchical workshop brings together artists to exchange critical supportive feedback to develop new, vulnerable, or ongoing projects.

Our feedback sessions are structured on a foundation of compassion - with the common goal to understand each other - in order to offer meaningful insights, relevant knowledge, and useful resources. The classes includes - guided questions, tools and exercises, group discussions, exercises, weekly breakout sessions wherein you get deep personal feedback from their peers. Artists can expect creative exercises and project deadlines to help prompt progress and deep introspection into their research & practice processes.

Embodying Process meets for 8 weeks, after which attending artists have time to complete the projects workshopped in class before submitting them for a group online culminating project; specifics TBD from our class discussions.

You can see Summer Session's Exhibition in our menu by clicking on 'Talks & Shows'.

Office Hours: Wednesdays 10 am - 11 am EST

March 27th - May 15th

Mondays
1 - 3:30 pm EST

16
Students

$1,250
USD

Amber Imrie is a queer artist, art educator, and founding team member of The Alternative Art School. She received her BA from UC Berkeley and MFA from Stanford University. She’s been the recipient of many awards, fellowships, and residencies including the Murphy Cadogan Award and Anita Squires Fowler Award in Photography. Amber Founded and was editor-in-chief of the art magazine, Venison Magazine from 2014-2017, ran a pop-up art residency, Camp Venison in 2015, and has facilitated critique sessions in and outside formal education. Imrie has taught at a variety of institutions, including UC Berkeley and Stanford University. Since 2020 Amber has worked alongside Nato Thompson building the Alternative Art School. Imrie lives in Winslow, Arkansas, and is developing a new body of artworks centered on queering the rural American South.

Amber Imrie, Home.Sweet, 2019 inkjet archival pigment ink photography on cotton, thread / 34 x 49 in - 86 x 125 cm
Amber Imrie, Isolation can Insulate or Suffocate, 2018 archival pigment ink on cotton, batting, sewing thread / 58 x 73x 5 in - 185 x 147 x 13cm
Amber Imrie, PinkPitsRedNecks, 2019 archival pigment ink on cotton, sewing thread / 30 x 52 in - 76 x 132 cm
Amber Imrie, Redneck, 2021 Performance/Video 6:14 min
Amber Imrie, Bootstrapped, 2021, Performance/Video 14:02 mins

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